German East Africa

German Colonies

In 1869, German missionaries established the first German presence in the territory that would become German East Africa. In 1884, the Company for German Colonization was founded by German explorer Carl Peters, and immediately began establishing treaties with local chiefs in the coastal region.

Over the next decade, the newly-founded German East Africa Company would increase German influence in the area by opening customs houses and forming agreements with local chiefs and Sultans. In the last years of the 1880s, however, Arabs opposed to the increased European presence began raiding and killing German settlers. The German East Africa Company requested assistance from the Imperial government, which quickly came in the form of ships and men under the command of newly-appointed Imperial Commissioner Hauptmann Hermann von Wissman. Within a year, the insurrection was crushed, and in 1891, Germany acquired sovereignty over the entire territory.

Post Offices in German East Africa included:

Amani (25 May 1903 – 17 July 1916)
Aruscha (6 December 1906 – 29 March 1916)
Bagamoyo/Bagamojo (4 October 1890 – August 1916)
Bismarkburg (26 September 1901 – 25 June 1916)
Buiko (1 December 1909 – May 1916)
Bukoba (14 September 1895 – 3 June 1916)
Dar-es-Salaam (4 October 1890 – 4 September 1916)
Dodoma (1 January 1911 – 28 July 1916)
Handeni (5 December 1911 – 22 June 1916)
Iringa (24 May 1898 – July 1916)
Kigoma (18 April 1914 – 21 July 1916)
Kilimatinde (10 January 1896 – 28 July 1916)
Kilossa (1 April 1895 – 20 August 1916)
Kilwa (14 April 1892 – 9 September 1916)
Kisaki (29 April 1895 – 15 March 1896)
Kissenji (20 December 1911 – 13 June 1916)
Kondoa-Irangi (1 December 1906 – 19 April 1916)
Korogwe (1 June 1902 – 12 June 1916)
Langenburg (5 June 1895 – 1901)
Leganga (1 February 1911 – 19 March 1916)
Lindi (17 May 1891 – 11 September 1916)
Mahenge (19 August 1901 – 3 September 1917)
Marangu (29 June 1895 – 18 May 1901)
Masinde (15 April 1895 – 15 March 1896)
Mikindani (30 October 1894 – 13 September 1916)
Mkalama (15 May 1910 – 12 April 1916)
Mkumbara (10 June 1908 – June 1916)
Mnyussi (9 May 1913 – June 1916)
Mohorro/Mohoro (1 February 1894 – 28 January 1917)
Mombo (20 May 1905 – 9 June 1916)
Morogoro (25 January 1904 – 26 August 1916)
Moschi (16 April 1895 – 11 March 1916)
Mpapua (20 April 1895 – August 1916)
Muaja (21 June 1908 – March 1915)
Muanza/Muansa (1 October 1895 – 14 July 1916)
Muhesa (12 March 1900 – 6 July 1916)
Musoma (2 September 1913 – 10 July 1916)
Neu-Langenburg (1901 – 30 May 1916)
Ngerengere (14 November 1908 – 31 December 1912)
Ngomeni (11 February 1913 – June 1916)
Pangani (15 June 1892 – 20 July 1916)
Ruanda (26 October 1908 – June 1916)
Saadani/Sadani (5 May 1892 – 25 July 1916)
Salale (3 August 1911 – August 1916)
Schirati (19 June 1905 – August 1914)
Soga (31 August 1911 – March 1916)
Ssongea/Songea (13 May 1899 – July 1916)
Tabora (15 July 1895 – 18 September 1916)
Tanga (5 May 1891 – 7 July 1916)
Tschole (1 November 1907 – 10 January 1915)
Ujiji/Udjidji (8 April 1898 – 20 July 1916)
Umbulu (25 March 1913 – March 1916)
Urundi (1 July 1913 – 6 July 1916)
Usumbura (22 September 1902 – 3 July 1916)
Utete (1 September 1913 – 29 January 1917)
Wiedhafen (25 October 1899 – 31 March 1912)
Wilhelmsthal (30 April 1899 – 9 June 1916)
Wugiri (13 September 1904 – 1 October 1909)

With the outbreak of World War I, German East Africa did not fall as the other German colonies did. German forces under General von Lettow-Vorbeck would embark on a lengthy campaign against British forces in the region, and would remain the only German foreign army in the field for the duration of the war. His forces finally surrendered on 25 November 1918, a week after the armistice in Europe.

Map of post offices — Google Earth

Physical Album Pages

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