Togo

German Colonies

In the mid- to late-19th Century, German missionaries and traders began settling Togo. By 1884, competition among traders in the area had led to conflicts with the natives, so German emissaries, acting at Bismark’s request, settled treaties with several native tribes, establishing a German protectorate over the coastal areas of Togo. The protectorate would expand slightly through an 1885 treaty with the neighboring French which gave Germany control over Klein-Popo.

Post Offices in Togo included:

Agbeluvhoe (16 November 1912 – 21 July 1914)
Agome-Palime (1 January 1903 – 14 August 1914)
Agu (16 September 1912 – 14 August 1914)
Anecho (1 January 1905 – 6 August 1914)
Assahun (17 September 1907 – 12/15 August 1914)
Atakpame (1 January 1907 – 26 August 1914)
Avhegame (renamed Agu) (1 May 1912 – 15 September 1912)
Ho (19 August 1907 – 12/15 August 1914)
Kete-Kratschi (10 August 1910 – 12/14 August 1914)
Klein-Pope (renamed Anecho) (1 March 1888 – 31 December 1904)
Kpandu (23 August 1907 – 12/15 August 1914)
Lome (1 March 1890 – 7 August 1914)
Noepe (18 September 1907 – 12/15 August 1914)
Nuatja (11 November 1906 – 15 August 1914)
Porto Seguro (1 July 1906 – 6 August 1914)
Sansane Mangu (1 March 1914 – 8 August 1914)
Sokode (7 February 1909 – 8 August 1914)
Tokpli (4 February 1907 – 12 August 1914)
Tsewie (1 April 1907 – 12/15 August 1914)

At the outbreak of World War I, British forces approaching from the west, together with French forces approaching from the east, quickly overwhelmed the meager German defenses. On 7-8 August 1914, the main coastal cities fell, forcing a German retreat up the Lome-Atakpame railway. Within weeks, all resistance ceased, with the final German capitulation occurring on 27 August 1914.

Map of post offices — Google Earth

Physical Album Pages (Hi Res)

Physical Album Pages
(Hi Res)

Physical Album Pages (Hi Res)

Physical Album Pages
(Med Res)


togo_post_offices