Kiauchau

German Colonies

In the late 19th Century, China was a valuable source of trade for the European nations, but was also highly unstable. Due to this instability, the European powers sought treaties under which the European powers would lease port cities, giving the countries safehavens for trade and their naval forces.

In November 1897, two German missionaries were murdered by a mob in Kiauchau. German naval forces occupied the city, and the German government used the occupation to press the Chinese government for a long-term lease of the port. In March 1898, Germany and China entered into a 99-year lease under which Germany would control both sides of the entrance to Kiauchau Bay, as well as the islands within. Around this leased territory would be a small neutral zone which would, in effect, also be under German control.

Post Offices in Kiauchau included:

Kaumi (5 July 1901 – 31 March 1906)
Kiautschou (27 October 1900 – 31 December 1905)
Litsun (7 December 1904 – September 1914)
Mecklenburghaus (13 September 1905 – 18 September 1914)
Schatsykou (1 February 1908 – September 1914)
Syfang (1 August 1906 – September 1914)
Taitungtschen (1 July 1911 – September 1914)
Tapatur (23 July 1900 – September 1914)
Tsangkou (1 April 1901 – 26 September 1914)
Tsingtau (26 January 1898 – 6 November 1914)
Tsingtau-Großhafen (15 January 1910 – September 1914)
Tsingtau-Tapautau (April 1905 – September 1914)

With the outbreak of World War I, Japanese forces invaded the territory on 5 September 1914. Despite fierce figthing, the German defenders held out until 7 November 1914, when they were finally forced to capitulate.

Physical Album
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Physical Album
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Map of post offices — Google Earth kiauchau_post_offices