China

German Offices Abroad

During the late 19th Century, China granted concessions to numerous foreign powers, including France, Great Britain, Russia, the U.S., Japan, and Germany.  As a result numerous foreign postal services had offices operating within the country.

Germany opened its first post office in China on 16 August 1886, in Shanghai, and would eventually open a total of 21 post offices in the country.  In addition, due to the influx of German military personnel into the German-leased areas and the Boxer Rebellion of 1900, numerous feldpost, naval and maritime post, and provisional cancels exist.

The last German post offices closed after China declared war on Germany on 16 March 1917.

Post offices in China included:

Amoy/Amoi (12 June 1902 – 16 March 1917)
Canton/Kanton (2 June 1902 – 16 March 1917)
Futschau (18 June 1900 – 16 March 1917)
Hankau (1 April 1900 – 16 March 1917)
Itschang (21 February 1903 – 1 September 1908)
Nanking (1 January 1903 – 16 March 1917)
Nanliu (22 March 1902 – 1 June 1902)
Peking (11 September 1900 – 15 March 1917)
Schanhaikwan (1 September 1901 – 31 October 1902)
Shanghai (16 August 1886 – 16 March 1917)
Swatau (17 May 1904 – 16 March 1917)
Tientsin (1 April 1893 – 16 March 1917)
Tongku (1 November 1900 – 30 April 1906)
Tschiangling (14 December 1901 – 22 March 1902)
Tschifu (1 January 1900 – 16 March 1917)
Tschingtschoufu (15 June 1903 – 31 December 1905)
Tschinkiang (28 October 1901 – 16 March 1917)
Tschoutsun (15 November 1903 – 31 December 1905)
Tschwinwangtau (1 December 1901 – 10 March 1906)
Tsinanfu (16 March 1904 – 16 March 1917)
Weihsien (1 June 1902 – September 1914)

Physical Album Pages
(Hi Res)

Physical Album Pages
(Med Res)

Map of post offices — Google Earth